Archive for the ‘Connecticut’ Category

‘Pick Your Own’ Strawberries at Jones Family Farm

June 24th, 2015

When Father’s Day approaches, it’s also my reminder that strawberry season is near. It’s been a few year since I’ve gone to pick berries, but last week we got lucky with an cool overcast day and returned to Jones Family Farm in Shelton. Admittedly, I got carried away and came home with WAY more berries than we could ever eat. We didn’t […]

 

Pick your own strawberries at Jones Farm in Shelton, CT
Pick your own strawberries at Jones Farm in Shelton, CT
When Father’s Day approaches, it’s also my reminder that strawberry season is near. It’s been a few year since I’ve gone to pick berries, but last week we got lucky with an cool overcast day and returned to Jones Family Farm in Shelton. Admittedly, I got carried away and came home with WAY more berries than we could ever eat. We didn’t stop picking until our “berry box” was filled close to the brim! And while $30 felt like a steal for so much locally grown fruit, I still had to figure out WHAT TO DO WITH 11 LBS of STRAWBERRIES!

Pick your own strawberries at Jones Farm in Shelton, CT

Want to head out on your own strawberry picking adventure?
Here are a few tips to consider before heading out to the Jones Family Farm:

  1. Call before you go!
    Always call ahead to the Farmer Jones Crop Line (203-929-8425)  to be sure the fields are open. We picked at Pumpkinseed Hill Farm, though Valley Farm was also open. Listen for the street address for your GPS. There are multiple locations for the fields, depending on the season. At other times of the year, you’ll find blueberries, pumpkins, Christmas trees and a winery!
  2. Consider the weather.
    If you have the option, I recommend going on an overcast day. There is no shade in the strawberry field and though picking goes relatively quickly, even an hour in the blazing June sun can be tough.  As an added bonus, outdoor photos are often much better when it’s overcast and there aren’t deep shadows caused by overhead sunlight!
  3. Dress appropriately.
    You’re visiting a farm. Sensible, closed-toed shoes are a good idea. There is hay in the aisles between the berries, but after a rain, there is a chance of mud. I also don’t recommend wearing anything white or that could be ruined by a red berry stain. No matter how hard I try, I always seem to leave the field with a red splotch somewhere on my clothes.
  4. What should I bring? 
    • A checkbook or cash. No credit cards accepted. Our filled box was about 11 lbs and just shy of $30. There is a discounted price per pound, if you pick over 8 lbs in one box.
    • A hat, sunscreen, bottle of water and anything else you might like to battle the full sun (if it’s a hot summer day). Leave as much as you can in the car. You’ll be picking low to the ground. Don’t saddle yourself with bags or other items to track while you’re in the field.
  5. What happens once I arrive?
    • Jones Farm supplies a long rectangular “berry box” with a handle or small quart baskets.
      • You’ll receive a credit if you re-use your box on a future visit.
      • If you’re going with kids, get them each a quart basket and have them consolidate their berries into the main large berry box before you leave the field.
    • Hop on the “berry ferry” which will give you a short ride out to the field. Once there, Jones Farm staff will direct you to your own row of berries to pick.
    • Before you start picking, take a minute and honestly consider how many berries you can use in the short term (or freeze).
    • Time to pick! Lift up the green leaves and you’ll see the ripe red berries beneath. Gently pinch the strawberry stem slightly above the berry. If you pick your entire row and still want more berries, you can ask to be assigned to another row.
    • When you’re done, you can walk back to the checkout building near the entrance or take another ride on the Berry Ferry. If you’re carrying more than a few pounds of berries, I recommend catching a ride, even though it’s not a long walk.
  6. Storing your berries.
    Get your berries into the fridge or freezer as quickly as you can. Once picked, strawberries are highly perishable and do not stand up well in extreme heat.
  7. How long does strawberry season last? 
    This varies from year to year, but typically strawberry season is winding down by the end of June. Blueberry season is up next, often starting around the 4th of July. Again, be sure to call the crop hotline to get the latest updates.

Pick your own strawberries at Jones Farm in Shelton, CT

What became of all these berries? Some were destined for the freezer. I also decided to bake a few strawberry-rhubarb pies. I sourced local rhubarb from Rose’s Berry – vendors at the Saturday Downtown Milford Farmers’ Market. For a recipe, I turned the ever reliable Smitten Kitchen and was pleased with the suggestion to use tapioca to firm up the fruit filling.

Happy picking! If you’ve got a favorite strawberry recipe or another PYO tip, I’d love to hear it in the comments section.

Jones Family Farm
Strawberry season (typically mid-late June)
Shelton, Connecticut
www.jonesfamilyfarm.com

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Lunch at Kawa Ni in Westport

January 29th, 2015

Have you been to Kawa Ni in Westport? It’s the latest sibling in the Westport le Farm and Whelk restaurant family. Kawa Ni appeared on the scene in August and I love that it’s open for lunch – even on Saturday!  If you’re thinking about dinner, know that they’re currently offering a “call before you leave and we’ll add you […]

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Kawa Ni in Westport
Have you been to Kawa Ni in Westport? It’s the latest sibling in the Westport le Farm and Whelk restaurant family. Kawa Ni appeared on the scene in August and I love that it’s open for lunch – even on Saturday!  If you’re thinking about dinner, know that they’re currently offering a “call before you leave and we’ll add you to a wait list” system. I’ll happily take that over a flat “no reservations” policy. Kawa Ni is small (40 seats), and it’s often hoppin’ in the evenings – especially the weekend. I know because we’ve tried stopping in for a drink after dinner at the Whelk, and found it impossibly crowded. Always double check the hours before you hop in the car, just to be on the safe side.

On to the food…

First up at lunch: a plate of karaage.  Really, you can’t go wrong with fried chicken.
If you’re eating with friends or family, it’s fun to share a few plates and explore the Yushoku section of the menu.

kawa-ni-westport-03-fried-chicken

If you’re unsure of what to try, ramen is easy place to start.
You’ll get a steaming hot bowl of noodles topped with locally-sourced ingredients.

kawa-ni-westport-04-brisket-ramen

kawa-ni-westport-05-butternut
Now that that Kawa Ni’s had a few months to settle in and serve up its take on Japanese cuisine, a few friends have mentioned to me that they are unsure of what to order. Kawa Ni is an izakaya-inspired restaurant. What does that mean, exactly? An izakaya is a Japanese drinking establishment that also serves up small plates of food.  So you’d expect a serious focus on drinks and we’re happy to find our friend, Jeff Marron behind the bar. He’s offering up a nice cocktail selection and several variations of the Kawa Ni signature drink, the sake bomb. These make a fine start when you arrive, but I’ve I found I prefer just sake with my meal. Cold sake, all the way. 

kawa-ni-westport-02-sake

Have no fear, I promise we’ll get back there to photograph more of the cocktail menu.

My family is Japanese, so many of the dishes and ingredients at Kawa Ni are familiar to me. Since there aren’t many Japanese restaurants serving up traditional flavors beyond just sushi/hibachi here in Connecticut, I can understand the uncertainty in navigating the menu. My first recommendation: talk to your server. If you need help, they can elaborate on any ingredient or preparation. Go to any of Chef Taibe’s restaurants, you’ll notice that all his servers are well-trained and extremely knowledgeable. As soon as I’ve made a first pass scanning menu, I like to ask what’s new and what we shouldn’t miss.

Check out a sample menu and you’ll have some idea what to expect.  Just don’t get too attached to any one dish. The menu changes frequently, as dictated by seasonal availability.  In case it helps, the current menu structure breaks down like this:

Kawa Ni menu sample

Yushoku: If you’re dining with someone else, start off by sharing a few of these plates to round out your meal.

Onigiri: I grew up calling them musubi, but whatever the name – they are really just rice balls with different toppings/fillings.

Sashimi: If you enjoying eating raw fish (hold the rice) at your favorite sushi bar or crudo at the Whelk, this section is for you.

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Donburi: Literally, a rice bowl. Another good place to start, if you like white rice. Japanese rice is a short grain, and a little on the sticky side compared to other varieties.

Men: Ramen is popping up everywhere these days. But at its core, it’s simply a noodle soup. If you like the other ingredients in the description- give it a try. The noodles have a different texture and thickness, so ask your server if you want to know more. And if you don’t like a lot of broth, consider the mazemen.

 

 

Enjoy your meal at Kawa Ni!
If you’ve got any favorites let me know so I can try them on my next visit!

Related:

More photos, please:
Kawa Ni preview

What’s the deal with ramen noodles?
Inside Sun Noodle, the Secret Weapon of America’s Best Ramen Shops

I want to try a traditional izakaya, but without getting on a flight to Japan:
Head to New York City. I like Sakagura (Midtown Manhattan, a short walk from Grand Central Terminal)

Where else can I get ramen in Fairfield County?
Mecha Noodle Bar  Brick Walk in Fairfield.
Kid-friendly. No reservations.

Any other recommendations for Japanese food in Connecticut?
Norimaki in Washingtown Depot
Get a dinner reservation, it’s long drive to Litchfield County

Miso 9th Square in New Haven
Sit at the sushi bar with Chef Jason Tay. Consider going omakase.
Or order the specials, they are expensive, but some of the finest sashimi I’ve eaten in Connecticut.

 

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Sport Hill Farm revisited

September 18th, 2014

Connecticut farm dinners have really grown in popularity and abundance the past 10 years, but a long-time favorite is my second Souterrain at Sport Hill Farm. It was an overcast afternoon, but I fondly remember a late Spring brunch in the greenhouse, surrounded by good friends. I had never been to this farm before, but to […]


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Connecticut farm dinners have really grown in popularity and abundance the past 10 years, but a long-time favorite is my second Souterrain at Sport Hill Farm. It was an overcast afternoon, but I fondly remember a late Spring brunch in the greenhouse, surrounded by good friends. I had never been to this farm before, but to me it has remained the most logical and beautiful backdrop for Bill Taibe’s movable feasts – more than any subsequent Souterrain location.  Living in Milford, I hardly find myself near Easton, CT, but frustrated that I’m always stuck at work and unable to attend the Westport Farmers’s Market, I decided to make a special trip back to Sport Hill Farm, while tomatoes and corn are enjoying an extended season.

If you’ve never met  farmer Patti Popp, she’s exhibits a knack for growing delicious food and a eye for the never-ending beauty in the cultivated world to which she tends. Just take a peek at Patti’s photos on instagram: @farmgal596. To top it off, she is a tireless educator and a gracious host. Thank you Patti for taking time out from your restaurant delivery prep to welcome Lily to the market.

Here, Patti’s offering up a lima bean for further inspection.
Lily is uncertain about touching these large beans!

The Sport Hill Farm market is a welcoming place for kids and has a toy farm + barnyard animals to keep little hands occupied while you browse the aisles!

Regardless of whether you have a little one in tow, the real reason to visit the farm is to stock up on flavorful, locally-grown produce and provisions. In season, the farm market is open daily (check the website or Facebook page for hours) and you’ll also find the farm gal’s smiling face at the Thursday Westport Farmers’ Market and the Saturday Black Rock Farmers’ Market.

Want to feed the chickens? Ask for a slice of bread at the market counter. After the bread was gone, Patti even brought out a hen for closer inspection!

Next we inquired about exploring the grounds surrounding the market. I was surprised when we went up the little embankment to see these plants that reminded me of mini palm/date trees. Upon closer inspection, I realized we had found a patch of dinosaur kale. Talk about know your farmer, know your food – it’s a little embarrassing I’ve never seen a lacinato kale plant before…

I couldn’t resist the cranberry beans. The pattern caught my eye, so I had to take a photo before the colors became muddled and murky on the stovetop. I’m not sure if this is odd, but I find it relaxing to shell beans (as long as they’re not favas). Without a recipe in mind, I bought a bagful and made a creamy bean dip.  If you find yourself with an eggplant and a bowl full of shelling beans (makes a great project to keep your little ones occupied) I noticed Patti featured this A Pinch of Salt recipe at the market.

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Miya’s Farm Dinner

August 4th, 2014

It is a lovely summer evening in a backyard in Woodbridge. This is a farm dinner organized by the New Haven Arts + Ideas festival, but unlike a typical outdoor farm-to-table event, dinner guests don’t just follow along on the usual tour – we are asked help forage for the meal ahead. Chef Bun Lai shares a […]

 

It is a lovely summer evening in a backyard in Woodbridge. This is a farm dinner organized by the New Haven Arts + Ideas festival, but unlike a typical outdoor farm-to-table event, dinner guests don’t just follow along on the usual tour – we are asked help forage for the meal ahead.

Chef Bun Lai shares a brief explanation of the plants he is seeking and releases the guests to help him gather ingredients.

The images of guests surrounding the chef to hand over harvested greens reminded me of two scenes. One is the line of Buddhists waiting to offer alms to the monks, an early morning ritual you can still see in parts of Southeast Asia. The other is of young schoolchildren, eager to share their discoveries with the teacher. This second image is an apt comparison. Bun Lai is as much an educator, as he is a chef – constantly reminding diners there are conscious and responsible decisions to be made with every bite of food you eat.

When the foraging is complete, we sit down to dinner at a long communal table in the Chef’s backyard. If you’re into food, you’ll know Bun Lai’s a big deal in Connecticut. This James Beard nominated chef and presides over Miya’s Sushi in New Haven. Miya’s seems to be a polarizing place, either you love the wildly inventive and environmentally-focused efforts of this sushi restaurant  – or you can’t seem to grasp what all the fuss is about.

Occasionally my love of tradition can get in the way of accepting the new and unfamiliar. I used to struggle with Miya’s long, tome-like menu (so I exaggerate, but if you’ve seen it, you know what I mean) and its atypical ingredients, but this farm dinner really deepened my understanding of the unique sushi I’ve eaten in past visits – from the traditions that inspire it, to the local, sustainable, and affordable sourcing that drives its ingredients and flavors. I may never quite get used to the rice, which is a mix of more healthful brown rice and other grains, but I cannot help but truly admire the positive impact this restaurant and its food values have had on both other chefs and the food community at large. This is precisely the reason why Bun Lai’s efforts are so important. If you’d like to read more about this innovative chef, I recommend  The Invasivore’s Dilemma (with killer photos) in Outdoor Magazine: or go straight to the source and check out his blog:  Call Me Bun.

If you’re a Miya’s fan, keep an eye out for special events like this one. It was a unique and memorable experience, even after attending several other Connecticut farm dinners.

If you’ve never been, but  live in or near New Haven, this is a important restaurant to try.
My advice is to read the sample menu beforehand and keep an open mind when you sit down for your culinary adventure!

Miya’s Sushi
68 Howe Street
New Haven, CT
miyassushi.com 

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Millwrights in Simsbury, CT

July 15th, 2014

This year we spent our 8th wedding anniversary alongside Hop Brook falls, dining in a former grist mill. In other words, we finally made our way  up to Millwright’s in Simsbury. Tuesdays are not an easy night to find a special occasion restaurant in Connecticut, but unlike so many other fine dining spots, Millwrights was not […]


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This year we spent our 8th wedding anniversary alongside Hop Brook falls, dining in a former grist mill. In other words, we finally made our way  up to Millwright’s in Simsbury. Tuesdays are not an easy night to find a special occasion restaurant in Connecticut, but unlike so many other fine dining spots, Millwrights was not only open, but quite busy!

Millwright’s first caught my attention last year when Chef Tyler Anderson swapped restaurants with fellow James Beard nominated Chef, Joel Viehland of Community table. It also came highly recommended by fellow blogger, Leeanne of  A La Carte.   Though we didn’t mind the 1.5 hr drive north to suburban Hartford (including some rush hour traffic), I wasn’t sure how soon we’d be able to return, so we opted for the 7 course tasting menu. Nearly every course was drawn from the nightly dinner menu, which makes the tasting menu a great way to get a handle on the kitchen’s “inspired New England” cuisine.  Once we settled into our quiet half-round booth set back along the wall, we were easily able to take in the leafy view and the hustle and bustle of a busy dining room in one glance. Service, food, decor – all beautifully executed. Fine dining is getting harder to come by in Connecticut, but this option is smartly tempered by a casual tavern downstairs. I would love to be a regular… if only Millwright’s was a little closer to home.

Wellfleet Oysters with Rhubarb and Black Pepper Mignonette

The Harajuku Negroni – easily one of the best cocktails I’ve had all year.

Maine Crab: buttermilk, lemon puree, shaved asparagus

House Made Ricotta: broccoli salad, pickled meyer lemon


Tapioca Custard: all the flavors of clam chowder

Foie Gras: strawberries, rhubarb consomme, brown bread crisps

Portuguese Fisherman’s Stew:
monkfish, mussels + clams, linguica, potatoes

Lamb:
grilled loin + sausage, white bean puree, fennel + sweet peppers

This dessert was inspired by a candy bar (Take 5?)   I wasn’t familiar with it, but you really can’t go wrong with chocolate, pretzel, and peanuts.

Despite dining on a Tuesday night, we were able to see the dining room in full swing. Parties both large and small arrived throughout the evening to celebrate school graduation.

After finishing our leisurely meal, we wandered downstairs to see the more casual dining space/bar that is paired with a tavern menu.

With twilight upon us, we finally took a walk along the water. This mixed-used development has a lovely feel to it, a balanced mix of old and new in a beautiful setting. On our way out, we met general manager AJ who took upstairs to see the space for private events. There, he confided he and Chef Anderson have their eye on New Haven County. These two seem a well-matched duo, paired up originally during their time at the Copper Beach Inn. Of course Millwright’s will remain their flagship spot for fine dining, but I look forward to seeing what they’ll be serving  up – especially in a location much closer to home!

 

 

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Sayonara 2013…

January 29th, 2014

It seems like we alternate our new year’s celebrations between Westport and New Haven. This year, I couldn’t have been happier with an early dinner at Miso. There’s nothing quite like bellying up to the sushi bar and letting chef Jason Tay set the pace for your final meal of the year. We don’t even […]

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Miso New Haven

It seems like we alternate our new year’s celebrations between Westport and New Haven. This year, I couldn’t have been happier with an early dinner at Miso. There’s nothing quite like bellying up to the sushi bar and letting chef Jason Tay set the pace for your final meal of the year. We don’t even bother with a menu.  That evening, we found ourselves alongside other regulars who we met many years ago at East Restaurant in Milford. There was a shared experience of some very fiery Vicious Viper hot sauce during our last encounter.

Miso New Haven

Yes they are pricey, but the best seafood is always on the specials board. Or ask Jason if he’s got anything else he recommends.

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

If you see Jason behind the sushi bar, sit down and know you’re in good hands.

Miso New Haven

Miso New Haven

This is a quiet moment in the dining room before the evening rush, but as always, I recommend sitting at the sushi bar and ordering as many as the specials as you can!

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Saugatuck Craft Butchery- new location

November 3rd, 2013

Saugatuck Craft Butchery in Westport has a new home. Not far, just across the Riverside Ave in a more spacious location. The best part? Now there’s a cafe, serving up some breakfast and lunch options. D’s steak and eggs: Dry-aged steak, bacon brioche “Toad in the Hole” Those are our shoestring fries, but the photo on the […]

 

Saugatuck Craft Butchery in Westport has a new home. Not far, just across the Riverside Ave in a more spacious location. The best part? Now there’s a cafe, serving up some breakfast and lunch options.

D’s steak and eggs: Dry-aged steak, bacon brioche “Toad in the Hole”

Those are our shoestring fries, but the photo on the right had me wishing for a burger…

I can never resist chicken and waffles. This version features a chicken breast, sage waffle, sunny side up egg and Doc’s Maple Syrup.

Check the website, as the cafe menu changes weekly.
And save the date for Porktoberfest November 10, 2013, 12-4 PM at Saugatuck Craft Butchery > advance tickets

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Milford Restaurant Week 2013

October 7th, 2013

Milford is hosting its first Restaurant Week from Monday, October 7 to Sunday, October 13.  That gives you about 25 different options ($20.13/pp for dinner or $12.13/pp for lunch). My favorite restaurant on the list is Bridge House in Devon, but we eat there all the time! A few other spots I’m contemplating for a return […]

 

Milford is hosting its first Restaurant Week from Monday, October 7 to Sunday, October 13.  That gives you about 25 different options ($20.13/pp for dinner or $12.13/pp for lunch). My favorite restaurant on the list is Bridge House in Devon, but we eat there all the time! A few other spots I’m contemplating for a return visit are Bin 100, Citrus and Beach House.

Visit www.milfordrestaurantweek.com to see all of the restaurant menus.

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“Fork It Over” No. 2 at Canon Grange

October 5th, 2013

Last weekend we got a seat at the Fork it Over table! Featuring a secret chef/location, it was the second in a series of benefit dinners for the Westport Farmers’ Market.  Sunday morning an email directed us to Canon Grange in Wilton, Connecticut. Turns out I’ve driven right past The Grange on my way to Schoolhouse at […]

 

Last weekend we got a seat at the Fork it Over table! Featuring a secret chef/location, it was the second in a series of benefit dinners for the Westport Farmers’ Market.  Sunday morning an email directed us to Canon Grange in Wilton, Connecticut. Turns out I’ve driven right past The Grange on my way to Schoolhouse at Cannondale and never even noticed it. Despite its unassuming facade, this was a surprisingly charming spot to host an Autumn dinner for 75. The evening’s special twinkle came from the collaborative efforts of multiple local tastemakers. Chefs Johnny Vaast and Tim LaBant put a single Berkshire hog front & center, with each family-style course paired with wine by Saugatuck Grain + Grape. In addition to top-notch food and drink, there were wonderful extras: a welcoming cocktail (Maple Old Fashioned), a vintage tablescape (punctuated with cheerful dahlia bouquets), and the rocking tunes of the band House Dressing filling the night air.

Inside the Grange. I’ve never seen Something Borrowed’s tableware look so at home.

Chef Johnny Vaast of the Dressing Room. (left) Shallot custard with a parsnip foam served in an eggshell (right)


Inside the Cannon Grange.

Fried Head cheese with pickled onion and mustard sauce (left). The full menu in front of the Danbury branch of the New Haven train line (right).

Uncle Jessie  (what a great looking Ford) looks perfect next to the Grange!

Jeff Marron of Saugatuck Grain + Grape serving up the Maple Old Fashioned (left) and some ice cold Brooklyn brews (right). I completely neglected to take photos of Mimi’s wine pairings!


Market director and event planner extraordinaire, Lori Cochran Dougall (left). Ryan Ryan Fibiger of Saugatuck Craft Butchery and Farah Masani of Farah’s Farm (right).

On to dinner.

1 ) Pork Sausage with apple cabbage salad

2) Mac & cheese

3) Pork shoulder with kale, turnip, dandelion, mustard greens and a soft egg.

4)  Grilled leg meat with lacinato kale, butternut squash, cranberry beans, radish in a ham hock broth with crispy pork belly

5) Apple and leek cornbread with maple bacon ice cream and candied pecans

6 ) Apple raisin spice cake with bourbon caramel, cider poached apples with maple ice cream

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Chef and food policy advocate Michel Nichan (center) playing with House Dressing band, of the Dressing Room in Westport. I hope other event organizers take note: I want to attend more farm-to-table dinners with live music!

This evening was a labor of love, honoring the sustainable, local food community that is united by the Westport Farmers’ Market.  If you’ve ever visited on a Thursday or Saturday and marveled at its busy hum or considerable range of vendors & offerings, please know the Westport Farmers’ Market needs your support. To find out how you can help, contact the Market Director Lori Cochran-Dougall.

Lastly, a big round of applause for the folks who brought this great event to life:

FOOD + DRINK  Johnny Vaast :: Dressing Room.  Tim LaBant :: Schoolhouse at Cannondale. Ryan Fibiger :: Saugutuck Craft Butchery. Farah Masani :: Farah’s Farm. Mimi McLaughlin + Jeff Marron :: Saugatuck Grain + Grape.  PLUS: Riverbrook Farm, Wave Hill Breads, Rose’s Berry Farm, Sport Hill Farm, Fort Hill Farm, Beltane Farm, Doc’s Maple Syrup VENUE Canon Grange. BAND Michel Nischan ::  House Dressing. VINTAGE TABLEWARE Lauren Kreter :: Something Borrowed. UNDERWRITERS Judy + John Wetzel. MARKET DIRECTOR Lori Cochran-Dougall :: Westport Farmers’ Market.

Monday morning October 7, 2013 is your final chance to secure a spot at this Fork it Over series. Sign up for the Westport Farmers’ Market newsletter to receive the 8 am announcement.

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Caffeine and Carburetors – Sept 2013

September 20th, 2013

The designer in me simply loves photographing cars, so I’m a bit embarrassed at how long it took to attend a Sunday morning edition of Caffeine and Carburetors. A big thank you to Amy + Ryan for sending monthly nudges my way. I wouldn’t call myself a car enthusiast (in fact 14 years of commuting […]


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The designer in me simply loves photographing cars, so I’m a bit embarrassed at how long it took to attend a Sunday morning edition of Caffeine and Carburetors. A big thank you to Amy + Ryan for sending monthly nudges my way. I wouldn’t call myself a car enthusiast (in fact 14 years of commuting has left me constantly trying to reduce my time on the road), but I don’t know how anyone could walk down Pine Street and not be wowed by the automobiles on display.

For Ryan, because there’s nothing like an old childhood favorite.

We’ve got bit of a British infatuation in our household.  My husband dreams about a Land Rover Defender and I’ve got a thing for E-type Jaguars.
D calls it my Morocco Mole-mobile, though I’m a bit too young for any Secret Squirrel references.

We of course bumped into Todd Brown, half the duo behind 109 Cheese and Wine and Will Drive 4 Food. For more from the September 8 gathering, check out his Garage and Cellar set on Flickr. If you’ve never been to Caffeine and Carburetors, put October 6 and November 3 on your calendar. While things kick off at 8 am on Sunday morning, it’s well worth getting out of bed and getting yourself to New Canaan. My favorite part was watching these cars motor out. Station yourself down by Zumbach’s starting around 9:30 and you can see all these beauties in motion.